How to Pick Your Protein Powder

iron vegan protein powders on marble background

Written by Janette Mason, CNP

One of the most common questions we get from our community is “what protein powder is right for me?”. With the vast number of protein powders that are now available, it makes sense that confusion would occur as you step into the well-stocked protein powder aisle. With label claims that jump out at you, like: “will help you shed weight”, “will help you build muscle”, “meal replacement”, and so on, the layers of confusion and misinformation are endless. 

At Iron Vegan, we believe in the power of plants, and we understand what individuals are looking for when they are wanting to include a protein powder in their diet. The powder must be easily digestible, it must taste great, and it must provide the nutrition that those who live busy lives are looking for. Our mission from day 1 has been to provide just that: simple nutrition that works with your body and comes from plants.

There are 3 main reasons we see individuals looking to include a protein powder supplement. Which one are you?

  1. You are looking for some additional support to meet your protein needs. You understand the importance of protein for potential weight management1, muscle function2, and proper recovery3 after injury.
  2. You are an athlete and work out regularly. You are looking for additional support for your workouts as well as wanting to feel better throughout your day.
  3. You are looking to improve body mass. You are looking for a protein powder supplement that will do more than just give you protein – you want additional nutritional support.

If you resonate with group #1, and you are looking for a clean, plant-based protein powder that can be easily added to a variety of recipes including smoothies and baked goods, then we would suggest you try Iron Vegan’s Sprouted Protein.

Sprouted Protein

How to Use:

Why:

 

-add a scoop to your smoothie, add to a shaker cup with water, or add to a recipe to increase protein. With a variety of flavours and unflavoured available, you can have a lot of fun with this protein powder

-provides 22g of protein

-ingredients are designed to work with your body

-the brown rice protein, grains, and seeds are sprouted to ensure easy digestion and high availability of protein4

If group #2 is speaking to you and you are looking for additional support in and out of the gym, we would suggest you try out Iron Vegan’s Athlete’s Blend.

Athlete’s Blend

How to Use:

Why:

 IV9012_Athletes_Blend_Vanilla_1 kg_Bag

-can use anytime during the day

-may use as a post-workout recovery snack

-add to your favorite smoothie recipe or simply add to a shaker cup with water

-provides 30g of protein

-designed specifically for the hard-training athlete with 7 additional support nutrients

-includes important nutrients such as l-glutamine (for repair)5, BCAAs (involved in protein synthesis)6, beetroot7 + quercetin (antioxidants), and zinc (frequently low in plant-based diets)8

Lastly, if you are someone who is wanting to improve their body mass, you have probably been researching and possibly trying out a variety of protein gainers that are on the market today. One problem that we see with some traditional gainers is that they contain a lot of “filler” ingredients and not the best stuff for our bodies. Things like artificial flavors, sweeteners, and colors are typically ingredients that we would advise you to stay away from.

Iron Vegan’s Athlete’s Gainer is a fresh option in the gainer category. It contains plant protein, along with some impressive support nutrients that include a variety of greens (kale, spinach, spirulina), along with a variety of healthy fats (MCT oil, flaxseed, and pumpkin seed oil), organic sprouted whole grains, and food concentrates like bitter melon and pineapple. Each ingredient serves a purpose and provides you with a whole new way to nourish your body and achieve the goals you are after.

Athlete’s Gainer

How to Use:

Why:

 IV9040 Athlete's Gainer Choc 2.5 kg

-add to your favorite smoothie recipe or add to a shaker cup with water/your choice of plant milk

-leveling up your daily nutrient profile with greens, sea vegetables, sprouted whole grains, and more!

- 42g of non-GMO plant-based protein

-12 g of fibre and only 1 g of sugar!

-2.85 : 1 carbohydrate to protein ratio

-A remarkably smooth and creamy taste!

 

References:

  1. Paddon-Jones, D., Westman, E., Mattes, R. D., Wolfe, R. R., Astrup, A., & Westerterp-Plantenga, M. (2008). Protein, weight management, and satiety. The American journal of clinical nutrition87(5), 1558S–1561S. https://doi.org/10.1093/ajcn/87.5.1558S
  2. Bosse, J. D., & Dixon, B. M. (2012). Dietary protein to maximize resistance training: a review and examination of protein spread and change theories. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition9(1), 42. https://doi.org/10.1186/1550-2783-9-42
  3. Russell L. (2001). The importance of patients' nutritional status in wound healing. British journal of nursing (Mark Allen Publishing)10(6 Suppl), S42–S49. https://doi.org/10.12968/bjon.2001.10.Sup1.5336
  4. Junzhou Ding and Hao Feng, Controlled germination for enhancing the nutritional value of sprouted grains, Sprouted Grains, 10.1016/B978-0-12-811525-1.00005-1, (91-112), (2019).
  5. Legault, Z., Bagnall, N., & Kimmerly, D. S. (2015). The Influence of Oral L-Glutamine Supplementation on Muscle Strength Recovery and Soreness Following Unilateral Knee Extension Eccentric Exercise. International journal of sport nutrition and exercise metabolism25(5), 417–426. https://doi.org/10.1123/ijsnem.2014-0209
  6. Matsumoto K, Koba T, Hamada K, Sakurai M, Higuchi T, Miyata H. Branched-chain amino acid supplementation attenuates muscle soreness, muscle damage and inflammation during an intensive training program. J Sports Med Phys Fitness. 2009;49(4):424–431.
  7. Gupta, K. J., Lee, C. P., & Ratcliffe, R. G. (2017). Nitrite Protects Mitochondrial Structure and Function under Hypoxia. Plant & cell physiology58(1), 175–183. https://doi.org/10.1093/pcp/pcw174
  8. Hunt J. R. (2002). Moving toward a plant-based diet: are iron and zinc at risk?. Nutrition reviews60(5 Pt 1), 127–134. https://doi.org/10.1301/00296640260093788

      More Reading

      View all
      What to Look For on a Protein Powder Label

      What to Look For on a Protein Powder Label

      Whether you're a seasoned gym-goer, or someone simply looking to add a nutritional boost to your diet, understanding the language of protein powder labels is crucial. So, grab your shaker bottle, a...

      How to Supercharge Your Day

      How to Supercharge Your Day

      How to fuel for your day and recover.

      This Is How Much Protein You Need

      This Is How Much Protein You Need

      The answer to all your protein needs